Supporting the First World War effort: money off memberships

More than 300 members of the Arlington Baths served in the armed forces during the First World War.

The Baths exempted them from paying annual fees but kept their places open for them to return.

A nurse’s request to join

In 1916 the Ladies section at the Arlington Baths also found another way to support the war effort. At the 1916 Ladies’ Annual General Meeting in June, it was recorded that:

“A letter was read by Miss Crombie [the Ladies section secretary] from a nurse in Woodside Hospital asking permission to join the Baths at a reduced rate, and it was decided to ask the gentlemen’s  permission to make a special rule in regard to nurses similarly situated.”

Arlington Baths Club Ladies minute book, 1 June 2016. Glasgow City Archives TD765/8

“A letter was read by Miss Crombie [the Ladies section secretary] from a nurse in Woodside Hospital asking permission to join the Baths at a reduced rate, and it was decided to ask the gentlemen’s  permission to make a special rule in regard to nurses similarly situated.”
Arlington Ladies Minute Book, 1 June 1916. Glasgow City Archives TD965/8
This request was duly agreed to by the gentlemen; they formed the management committee of the Baths and made the decisions about admission rates.

“A letter from Mr Sloan was read by Miss Crombie, in which he said the gentlemen’s committee agreed to the admission of nurses at the rate of 7/6 per quarter…”

Arlington Baths Club Ladies minute book, 7 September 2016. Glasgow City Archives TD765/8.

So did the Woodside Hospital nurse then join? Sadly, we have no record of of applications in 1916 so we’re not sure if she became an Arlington swimmer.

But we have found the applications of three other nurses who joined in 1917.

They all worked at Park Nursing Home, situated at 12 Claremont Terrace. That’s in Park Circus area, just up the hill, and less than 10 minutes walk from the Baths. They all applied on the same day and had the same proposer – Thomas Montgomerie – and seconder – John Robinson.

Sister Archibald’s proposal formNurse Flockhart’s proposal formNurse McGowan’s proposal formAll from Arlington Baths Ladies Proposal Book 1917-1919 (Glasgow City Archives TD965/48)

On the same date Thomas Montgomery and John Robinson signed the application for Mrs Montgomery  – his wife.

We’re not sure how were they connected to Sister Archibald and the nurses – hopefully further research will reveal more.

12 Claremont Terrace

The building where they worked had an illustrious history: from 1871 to 1900 12 Claremont Terrace was the home of Sir James King, Baronet. He was a successful manufacturer, a prominent citizen and Lord Provost of Glasgow from 1886-1889.

In 1901 he left the property and it became Claremont Private Nursing Home. In 1907 it became Park Nursing Home, and continued as that for many years afterwards.

Last year the building was renovated as private flats, and this is how it looks now:

Photo of a very large Victorian mansion built in blond sandstone on the corner of a street

Researcher: Lucy

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